The Pros and Cons of “Next-Gen” Sharing

With so many great games now quickly approaching, content sharing is going to be thrust into the spotlight even more since both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 have launched. Being able to capture, edit, and share videos or other media has never been easier from either console as each features diverse methods for capturing and sharing game content. I wanted to take a minute to share some of my favorite and least favorite things about both services.

Have a look below the jump for the full post…

Xbox One Pros

1. Really, the best thing about video capture on the Xbox One is how easy it is. If you have a Kinect active, just saying “Xbox, Record That” instantly captures the last 30 seconds of gameplay. So if you do something totally sweet, it’s pretty simple to save that moment. Believe me, I use this little phrase often and it’s incredibly handy. At the time of this writing, Xbox One’s without Kinect won’t have access to this feature which completely negates this whole point.

The alternative is snapping the GameDVR aka Upload and then recording up to the next five minutes of gameplay. It’s really easy to set up whether you use Kinect or traditional controls.

2. The other aspect which is really nice with the Xbox One is that it’s well documented online and even on the console itself of how to capture video. In my opinion, the entire process is much easier to understand than the PlayStation 4.

3. Editing and sharing captured gameplay is also insanely easy to work with. Using the Upload Studio app, you’ve given access to a number of editing methods and the console even lets you upload to various places like YouTube and OneDrive.

Xbox One Cons

1. The thing that is the most disappointing to me with the Xbox One is that the DVR will only record five minutes at a time. Granted, for some games this isn’t a problem but what if you want to play a game like Diablo III or Destiny and the gameplay segment you’re looking to record lasts more than five minutes? Well, you’re out of luck in that regard. I have heard that this is something Microsoft is looking at increasing so hopefully this time limit can be increased at some point through an update.

2. To that end, I like to refer to the Xbox One capture tools as being reactionary. It’s incredibly easy to react to things that happen instantly and record then, but preparing for things to happen is a bit more tricky seeing as you can only prepare for up to five minutes at a time. You can set the Xbox to record the last five minutes as well using the snap Game DVR menu, but the system is not as intuitive as the PS4.

PlayStation 4 Pros

1. Unlike the Xbox One, the PlayStation 4 is much more generous with the amount of time you can use in your recordings.  Users can capture or save up to fifteen minutes of gameplay which does help in providing a bit of flexibility in planning what you want to record.

2. The nice thing about the PlayStation 4 is that it’s always recording in the background as you’re playing a game. If you want to save a clip, hit the share button and press square or double tap the share button to begin recording from that point.  It’s really easy to do and you don’t need to sacrifice a slice of your screen.

3. While initially shipping without any way to edit captured gameplay, Sony put out a fantastic editing suite known as “ShareFactory” a few months back. It’s insanely powerful and really lets users flex their creativity. While there’s a slight learning curve to it, once you wrap your head around the tool, the skies the limit with what you can come up with.

PlayStation 4 Cons

1. While we do know it’s coming, as of right now and since the system launched late last year, there’s been no ability to directly upload your videos to places like YouTube. The default is Facebook and even then you have to do some creative work to grab that footage to post it elsewhere. Thankfully a solution is in sight as Sony has promised in the next major update that direct uploading to YouTube will finally arrive. So for now, this is only a temporary con.

2. The worst element to the PlayStation 4 is just how obtuse the video recording process is. I had to do extensive research in my Beginner Tips post here in order to fully understand all the ins and outs of the video capture process on this console as it’s just not documented well. Sure, it’s fairly easy once you know what you’re doing, but for people that have just gotten the system, there’s no easy way to figure it out without going online and using Google.

Conclusion

You could say that this post is inspired by Destiny. If you haven’t already noticed, I’m a fan of sharing whether it be through screenshots or videos. I’m a big fan of capturing gameplay whether cool moments, weird glitches, or just to give people a look at a game. With Destiny poised to be one of the year’s biggest titles, it got me thinking of ways I could capture and share footage.

For right now, I’m picking up a copy for the Xbox One mainly due to more of my friends playing there. That’s fine, I own both consoles, so it’s not a big deal. In this particular case, I kind of wish the Xbox had the ability to record longer gameplay clips especially for a massive game like Destiny. The last 30 seconds is fine for a cool thing to have happened, but for the real meat and potatoes of the game, five minutes just won’t cut it. You’ll need to record multiple videos in succession and then stitch them together. Doable yes, but ultimately annoying. The thirty minutes that PlayStation gives you seems to suit a longer game like Destiny much better especially for those Strike missions.

Oh well, it’ll just need a work around. For you all, I’ll make it work.

I do plan to have Destiny media available to you all soon so make sure you’re following me in the following places to see them as they arrive: Twitter, Twitch, Facebook, YouTube.

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